Assessing the Efficacy and Mechanisms of Pycnogenol® on Cognitive Aging From In Vitro Animal and Human Studies

Comment

Assessing the Efficacy and Mechanisms of Pycnogenol® on Cognitive Aging From In Vitro Animal and Human Studies

Converging evidence suggests that the biomodulating effects of PYC improve several mechanisms that may underpin cognition including vascular, anti-inflammatory, neuroprotective, and antioxidant processes. Research into PYC for improving cognitive function is growing with preliminary clinical studies indicating benefits on several cognitive domains including attention, memory, and executive functioning.

Comment

Learn How the NEW Nutrition Facts Label Can Help You Improve Your Health

Comment

Learn How the NEW Nutrition Facts Label Can Help You Improve Your Health

The US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) issued new regulations changing the Nutrition Facts label on packaged foods. This is the first major change to the label since it was introduced in 1994. The changes are based on updated science, the most recent dietary recommendations, and input from the public. Using the new label can help you choose foods for a healthy diet. The label will be required on all packaged foods made in the United States and imported from other countries. All packaged food and beverage containers produced by large manufacturers will have the new label by July 2018, and items produced by small manufacturers will have it by July 2019. Some products already have the new label.

Comment

TOP 12 FOODS TO CHOOSE ORGANIC!

Comment

TOP 12 FOODS TO CHOOSE ORGANIC!

These 12 foods are the most commonly and highly contaminated with pesticides and chemicals, even after washing and peeling. The research used to compile this list is from extensive independent tests run by the FDA and the USDA from over 100,000 samples of food. The chemical pesticides detected in these studies are known to cause cancer, birth defects, nervous system and brain damage, and development problems in children.

Panic if it ain’t organic.

Comment

The State of Obesity.

Comment

The State of Obesity.

New Report Finds Florida's Obesity Rate is 27.4 Percent, Florida has the 14th Lowest Rate.  Report Provides Recommendations for Actions as Adult Obesity Rates Now Exceed 35 Percent in 5 States

Washington, D.C., August 31, 2017 — The adult obesity rate in Florida is 27.4 percent, the 14th lowest, according to the 14th annual State of Obesity: Better Policies for a Healthier America report from the Trust for America's Health (TFAH) and the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation (RWJF).

This year, adult obesity rates exceeded 35 percent in five states, 30 percent in 25 states and 25 percent in 46 states. As of 2000, no state had an obesity rate above 25 percent.

Transformations Medical Weight Loss

In the past year, adult obesity rates increased in four states (Colorado, Minnesota, Washington and West Virginia), decreased in one state (Kansas), and remained stable in the rest. This supports trends that have shown steadying levels in recent years. Last year was the first time this annual report recorded any declines in adult obesity rates, with four states experiencing declines, and, overtime, growth has started to slow. In 2006, rates increased in 31 states; in 2010 rates increased in 16 states.


The State of Obesity also found that:

  • Colorado had the lowest adult obesity rate at 22.3 percent and West Virginia had the highest at 37.7 percent.

  • Nine of the 11 states with the highest obesity rates are in the South and 23 of the 25 states with the highest rates of obesity are in the South and Midwest.

  • Adult obesity rates have striking racial and ethnic inequities - with rates above 40 percent for Blacks in 15 states, rates at or above 35 percent among Latinos in nine states compared with rates above 35 percent among Whites in one state. Florida's adult obesity rate is 35.2 percent for Blacks; 26.8 percent for Latinos; and 25.7 percent for Whites.

  • Obesity rates are around 30 percent higher among adults without a college education and with incomes below $15,000 compared with other adults.

  • One-in-four young adults who try to join the military are ineligible due to fitness and weight concerns.

The report finds that rates are showing signs of leveling off, but progress could be eroded if programs are cut and policies are weakened. In addition, the report reviews other studies that have found childhood rates have stabilized over the past decade, and decreased among low-income preschoolers between 2011 and 2014.

"Obesity rates are still far too high, but the progress we've seen in recent years is real and it's encouraging," said Richard E. Besser, MD, president and CEO of RWJF. "That progress could be easily undermined if leaders and policymakers at all levels don't continue to prioritize efforts that help all Americans lead healthier lives."

To accelerate progress in addressing obesity, RWJF and TFAH urge policymakers to:

  • Invest in prevention at the federal, state and local levels, including full funding for the Centers for Disease Control and the Prevention, Prevention and Public Health Fund.

  • Prioritize early childhood policies and programs, including support for Head Start and the Child and Adult Care Food Program.

  • Maintain progress on school-based policies and programs, including full implementation of current nutrition standards for school foods.

  • Invest in community-based policies and programs, including nutrition assistance programs such as the Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program (SNAP), and transportation, housing and community development policies and programs that support physical activity.

  • Fully implement menu labeling rules and the updated Nutrition Facts label.

  • Expand healthcare coverage and care, including continued Medicare and Medicaid coverage of the full range of obesity prevention, treatment and management services.

"It's clear that the progress we've made in fighting obesity is fragile-and that we're at a critical juncture where continuation of the policies that show promise and increased support and resources could truly help bend the rising tide of obesity rates," said John Auerbach, president and CEO of TFAH. "We're far from out of the woods when it comes to obesity. But we have many reasons to be optimistic thanks to parents, educators, business owners, health officials and other local leaders. Our nation's policymakers must follow their example to build a culture of health."

State-by-state adult obesity rates and a new policy web-based interactive featuring more than 20 policies focused on preventing and reducing obesity are available on http://stateofobesity.org/.

The obesity rate analyses are based on the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention's Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System (BRFSS). (Note: the methodology for BRFSS changed in 2011). The State of Obesity report (formerly known as F as in Fat), with state rankings and interactive maps, charts and graphs, is available at http://stateofobesity.org. Follow the conversation at #StateofObesity.


2016 STATE-BY-STATE ADULT OBESITY RATES

Based on an analysis of new state-by-state data from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention's Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance Survey, adult obesity rates by state from highest to lowest were:

Note: 1 = Highest rate of adult obesity, 51 = lowest rate of adult obesity.

1. West Virginia (37.7); 2. Mississippi (37.3); 3. (tie) Alabama (35.7) and Arkansas (35.7); 5. Louisiana (35.5); 6. Tennessee (34.8); 7. Kentucky (34.2); 8. Texas (33.7); 9. Oklahoma (32.8); 10. (tie) Indiana (32.5) and Michigan (32.5); 12. South Carolina (32.3); 13. (tie) Iowa (32) and Nebraska (32); 15. North Dakota (31.9); 16. North Carolina (31.8); 17. Missouri (31.7); 18. Illinois (31.6); 19. Ohio (31.5); 20. (tie) Alaska (31.4) and Georgia (31.4); 22. Kansas (31.2); 23. (tie) Delaware (30.7) and Wisconsin (30.7); 25. Pennsylvania (30.3); 26. (tie) Maine (29.9) and Maryland (29.9); 28. South Dakota (29.6); 29. (tie) Arizona (29) and Virginia (29); 31. Oregon (28.7); 32. Washington (28.6); 33. New Mexico (28.3); 34. Minnesota (27.8); 35. Wyoming (27.7); 36. (tie) Florida (27.4) and Idaho (27.4) and New Jersey (27.4); 39. Vermont (27.1); 40. (tie) New Hampshire (26.6) and Rhode Island (26.6); 42. Connecticut (26); 43. Nevada (25.8); 44. (tie) Montana (25.5) and New York (25.5); 46. Utah (25.4); 47. California (25); 48. Hawaii (23.8); 49. Massachusetts (23.6); 50. D.C. (22.6); 51. Colorado (22.3).

Comment

The Reality of The Situation

Comment

The Reality of The Situation

The numbers don't lie. Obesity is a growing problem for the entire planet, but when compared to the United States it seems we are trying to beat the rest of the world to the buffet line.

Obesity isn't a problem just because it makes your clothes fit tight, it's what it eventually leads to; avoidable health problems that are closely related to diet. Cardiovascular Disease killed nearly 18 million people in 2016 alone, add another 3.2 million if you include Diabetes related deaths and that's nearly the entire population of Australia. It doesn't have to be this way for you or your family, but at the end of the day the choice is yours. Just remember, we are here to support you through the transition to long term healthy eating patterns that lead to lower BMI.

Comment

Trans Fatty Acids

Comment

Trans Fatty Acids

Trans fatty acids are even worse for your health than the saturated fats in sour cream, butter, and lard, we hear from nutrition expert Suzanne Havala Hobbs, Dr. PH, Rd. According to the National Academy of Sciences, trans fatty acids increase your risk of heart attack by raising "bad" LDL cholesterol and lowering levels of protective HDL cholesterol as much or more so than do saturated fats. There is no safe level of intake.

Comment

How I lost 41 lbs in one year in my 60's.

Comment

How I lost 41 lbs in one year in my 60's.

As science evolves we are just beginning to understand that obesity is actually quite complicated, with hormones, like Cortisol, Leptin, Ghrelin, sleep deprivation, stress, and our minds playing an important role in how we eat and gain weight. These mechanism of self-preservation which were once so paramount during evolution of man, has remained with us at a time when food is abundant in the US. Understanding the reasons and the mechanisms will help us understand and accept that losing weight is not an easy task but can be achievable if we only focus on…

Comment

Why exercise won't make you lose weight

Comment

Why exercise won't make you lose weight

Every January, one of the top New Year's resolutions is to lose weight. And if you're looking to be successful, there's something you should know: Diet is far more important than exercise -- by a long shot.

As the saying goes: Abs are made in the kitchen, not the gym.

Comment

What customers want on a diet.

Comment

What customers want on a diet.

According to U.S. weight loss & diet trends 2016-2017 here's what customers want on a diet.

Encourage long-term healthy habits
Include a variety of foods
Within my food budget
Easy to understand and follow

Comment

Food for thought.

Food for thought.

What does it really take to burn off what you ate?
15 examples that will help put things into perspective.

Can Diet Soda Make You Fat?

Comment

Can Diet Soda Make You Fat?

Diet soda may not be a good weapon in your battle of the bulge. This comes from two new studies that indicate diet soda may contribute to larger waistlines and even to diabetes.

Comment

Add Years to Your Life!

Comment

Add Years to Your Life!

We at Transformations want you to achieve your weight loss goals, but we would also like to have a part in helping you achieve life goals, like living longer! Our program is designed to help you lose weight, but also to help you stay or become healthier. We hope this information is helpful.

Comment

How Antioxidants Help With Weight Loss

Comment

How Antioxidants Help With Weight Loss

Losing Fat, Taking Appetite Suppressants and/or Thermogenics Will Have the Side-Effects of Producing Free Radicals and Releasing Stored Toxins from the Fat Cells Being Burned. These Same Released Toxins Hurt the Body's Ability to Metabolize or Break Down More Fat. IN OTHER WORDS, THIS PROCESS HINDERS WEIGHT LOSS RESULTS!

Comment

Understanding the American Obesity Epidemic

Comment

Understanding the American Obesity Epidemic

Obesity — everyone knows it’s bad and that it’s everywhere.

Nearly 78 million adults and 13 million children in the United States deal with the health and emotional effects of obesity every day. The solution to their problem sounds deceptively simple — take in fewer calories a day, while cranking up the calorie-burning process with regular exercise.

Comment

Anti-Aging Effects of Pycnogenol

Comment

Anti-Aging Effects of Pycnogenol

This proprietary French Maritime Pine Bark Extract contains procyanidins, bioflavonoids, and other health-giving molecules that synergistically support the body’s natural defenses against five major processes that characterize premature aging.

Comment